Description

If you dream of seeing your designs on the catwalks in Paris, Milan and New York, then this program will provide you with everything you need to achieve it” 

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Fashion is constantly evolving, driven by the creative geniuses that know, years in advance, what the next trends will be. Thus, the influence of these people is enormous, since the importance of design, clothing and fabrics is becoming more and more important on a social and cultural level. In short, millions of people define themselves, to a large extent, based on their appearance, and clothing plays an enormous role in this area. 

For that reason, major textile companies and the most prestigious design houses are constantly looking for the next design stars, who not only know all the tailoring techniques and working methods, but who can bring a fresh vision and revolutionary style to their garments. This Advanced Master’s Degree, therefore, has been elaborated with this perspective in mind, as it will provide the student with everything they need to be able to excel in this competitive and exciting world. 

To this end, it will provide you with the best knowledge on issues such as clothing design, jewelry and accessories design, marketing a collection, the best pattern-making and tailoring techniques, both for men and women, fashion design, textile technology or the history of clothing, among many others. 

The designer, therefore, will be able to become a leading figure in this field thanks to this program, which is developed through a 100% online learning system specially designed for working professionals. The student will also be accompanied by the best teaching staff, who will guide them using numerous multimedia resources: videos, master classes, interactive summaries or all kinds of complementary readings. 

The big fashion houses are looking for the new fashion stars: you could be one of them" 

This Advanced Master’s Degree in Integral Fashion Design contains the most complete and up-to-date program on the market. The most important features include: 

  • Practical cases studies presented by experts in design and fashion 
  • The graphic, schematic, and eminently practical contents with which they are created, provide scientific and practical information on the disciplines that are essential for professional practice 
  • Practical exercises where self-assessment can be used to improve learning 
  • Special emphasis is placed on innovative methodologies in integral fashion design 
  • Theoretical lessons, questions to the expert, debate forums on controversial topics, and individual reflection assignments 
  • Content that is accessible from any fixed or portable device with an Internet connection 

This program not only offers a walk through the history and technical side of fashion design, but it also provides you with a great creative insight with which to improve your clothing collections” 

The teaching staff includes professionals from the field of design, who bring their experience to this training program, as well as renowned specialists from leading societies and prestigious universities. 

The multimedia content, developed with the latest educational technology, will provide the professional with situated and contextual learning, i.e., a simulated environment that will provide an immersive training experience designed to train for real-life situations. 

This program is designed around Problem-Based Learning, whereby the student must try to solve the different professional practice situations that arise during the academic year. For this purpose, the professional will be assisted by an innovative interactive video system created by renowned and experienced experts.  .  

The 100% online system at TECH will allow you to study at your own pace, without interrupting your daily life and without restricting you to rigid timetables"

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You will have access to the best teaching resources, taught by a teaching staff of great prestige within the world of fashion"

Syllabus

This Advanced Master’s Degree has been organized into 22 specialized modules, through which the professional will be able to delve into different relevant issues such as structural and integral design in fashion, focusing on aspects such as expression drawing or composition, the different products and textile technologies, the fundamentals of design, creative research, the history of clothing, or photography aimed at the field of fashion. With this, the student will have obtained a complete knowledge that will enable them to progress in this industry quickly and safely. 

mejor master diseno moda integral

You have at your fingertips the best content to develop a successful career in the fashion world"  

Module 1. Structural and Integral Fashion Design

1.1. Expressive Drawing 

1.1.1. Anatomical Structure of the Human Body 
1.1.2. Three-Dimensional Space 
1.1.3. Perspective and the Matrix Analysis 

1.2. Visual Semiotics 

1.2.1. Color and Light in 3D forms 
1.2.2. Contour and Shading 
1.2.3. The Movement of Clothes in the Female and Male Anatomy 

1.3. Composition I 

1.3.1. Volume 
1.3.2. Female Silhouette and Male Silhouette 
1.3.3. Form and Negative Form 

1.4. Composition II 

1.4.1. Symmetry and Asymmetry 
1.4.2. Construction and Deconstruction 
1.4.3. Draping and Jewel Embellishments 

1.5. Representation Tools 

1.5.1. Geometric Sketch 
1.5.2. Rapid Sketching and Poison Techniques 
1.5.3. Canva 

1.6. Design Methodology 

1.6.1. Computer-Assisted Learning 
1.6.2. CAD/CAM: Prototypes 
1.6.3. Finished Products and Production Runs 

1.7. Customization and Transformation of Clothes 

1.7.1. Cutting, Sewing and Finishing 
1.7.2. Pattern Adaptations 
1.7.3. Garment Customizations 

1.8. Packaging 

1.8.1. Packaging as an Extension of Branding 
1.8.2. Sustainable Packaging 
1.8.3. Automated Personalization 

1.9. Atomic Design  

1.9.1. Components of the System 
1.9.2. Templates  
1.9.3. Web Typology of the Designers 

1.10. App Design  

1.10.1. Illustration Techniques With a Cellphone 
1.10.2. Integral Design Tools: Procreate 
1.10.3. Support Tools: Pantone Studio 

Module 2. Textile Product 

2.1. Anthropology of Design 

2.1.1. Transformation of the Dress into an Item of Sports Clothing 
2.1.2. Visual Thought: Rhetoric and Language 
2.1.3. Product Artification in the Fashion Industry 

2.2. Gender in the Design of a Product 

2.2.1. Feminine Dress 
2.2.2. Masculine Suit 
2.2.3. Hybridization of Fashion Garments 

2.3. Accessories Design 

2.3.1. Leather and Synthetic Materials 
2.3.2. Jewelry 
2.3.3. Footwear  

2.4. Product Design  

2.4.1. Prototype Creation 
2.4.2. Fashion Tech Environment and New Industrial Fabrics 
2.4.3. Transformation of Prototypes 

2.5. Fashion Garment Manufacturing 

2.5.1. Sewing Machine 
2.5.2. Body Volume and Measurements  
2.5.3. Sewing and Fitting Techniques for Garments 

2.6. Industrial Production of Fashion Garments I 

2.6.1. Pattern Making and Production Techniques 
2.6.2. Prints 
2.6.3. Moulage and Industrial Pattern Making  

2.7. Industrial Production of Fashion Garments II 

2.7.1. Scaling Techniques  
2.7.2. Size Scaling 
2.7.3. Transformation of Patterns 

2.8. Textile Design  

2.8.1. Fabrics and Materials  
2.8.2. Corporate and Seasonal Palette 
2.8.3. Product Development Techniques  

2.9. Lingerie and Corsetry  

2.9.1. Specific Fabrics for Underwear 
2.9.2. Specific Patterns 
2.9.3. Garment Assembly  

2.10. Product Testing  

2.10.1. Establishment of Product Capabilities 
2.10.2. Evaluation of the Product in Relation to the Market and its Consumer 
2.10.3. Product Redesign 

Module 3. Accessories and Jewelry Design 

3.1. Anatomy and Patterns of Accessories  

3.1.1. Footwear  
3.1.2. Bags and Belts  
3.1.3. Costume/Imitation Jewelry and Authentic Jewelry  

3.2. Specific Materials for Accessory Design  

3.2.1. Fittings and Hardware  
3.2.2. Synthetic Fabrics  
3.2.3. Technical Materials  

3.3. Workflow  

3.3.1. Supplier Relationships  
3.3.2. Industrial Custom Fabrication  
3.3.3. Market Prices   

3.4. Product Prototype  

3.4.1. Drawing and Sketching  
3.4.2. Product Data Sheet   
3.4.3. Large-Scale Production: INGA 3D  

3.5. Jewelry Design  

3.5.1. Gems and Precious Stones  
3.5.2. Costume Jewelry and Alternative Materials  
3.5.3. Jewelry Prototype With 3D Printing  

3.6. RhinoJewel  

3.6.1. Tools for Metal and Gems  
3.6.2. Modelling Tools   
3.6.3. Calibrated Stone Tools  

3.7. Product Development  

3.7.1. Creativity and Viability of the Accessory  
3.7.2. Collection Development: Brand Alignment  
3.7.3. Presentation Methodology of an Accessory Collection  

3.8. Leather   

3.8.1. Animal Skin and its Treatment  
3.8.2. Synthetic Materials  
3.8.3. Sustainability and the Environment  

3.9. Customization and Transformation of Accessories  

3.9.1. Manual Transformation  
3.9.2. Beads and Charms  
3.9.3. Jewelry Garments: Belts, Bag Fasteners and Jeweled Dresses   

3.10. Watches and Sunglasses  

3.10.1. Goldsmith Work and Composition   
3.10.2. Specific Materials  
3.10.3. Mounting    

Module 4. Special Garment Clothing 

4.1. Sports Collections 

4.1.1. Evolution of Sports Fashion 
4.1.2. Casual Style Design and Creativity 
4.1.3. Sportswear and Activewear Garments 

4.2. Pattern and Design of Sports Clothing 

4.2.1. Ergonomy of the Sportsperson 
4.2.2. Pattern-Making Technique 
4.2.3. Technical Materials: Evaporation, Transpiration and Waterproofing 

4.3. Clothing Design for Cinema and Television Series 

4.3.1. Influence of Fashion in Performing Arts 
4.3.2. Wardrobe Department of a Movie 
4.3.3. Revision of the Script for the Design of Fiction Clothing 

4.4. Workflow in Cinema  

4.4.1. Documentation of Period and Styles 
4.4.2. The Cinematographic Ambience Through Costumes 
4.4.3. Fabrics and Techniques Applied for the Final Result 

4.5. Cinema Wardrobe 

4.5.1. Animation Wardrobe 
4.5.2. Marvel Wardrobe 
4.5.3. Period Costumes 

4.6. Catwalk and Cinema Galas 

4.6.1. Experimental Pattern Making  
4.6.2. Figure Drawing for Models and Actresses 
4.6.3. The Staging of the Costumes on the Red Carpet 

4.7. Stage Fiction 

4.7.1. Costumes for Opera 
4.7.2. Costumes for Theater 
4.7.3. Costumes for Dance and the Circus 

4.8. Haute Couture 

4.8.1. Tailor-Made Garments 
4.8.2. Creative Illustration Techniques 
4.8.3. Wedding Collections 

4.9. Tailoring 

4.9.1. Suit Pattern in Men and Women 
4.9.2. Seasonal Fabrics 
4.9.3. Future Trends in Custom Tailoring 

4.10. Product Placement 

4.10.1. Collaborations with Consolidated Brands for Television Series' Wardrobe 
4.10.2. Proposal and Nez
4.10.3. Selection of Garments and Cost of the Collaboration 

Module 5. CLO Virtual Fashion Design 

5.1. Current Design Techniques 

5.1.1. 2 Dimension Design 
5.1.2. 3 Dimension Design 
5.1.3. The CLO Virtual Fashion Program 

5.2. Digital Creation and Experimental Design 

5.2.1. Digital Creation and Experimental Design  
5.2.2. User Interface of CLO Virtual Fashion 
5.2.3. 3D Avatars Animation 

5.3. Virtual Tailoring 

5.3.1. Segmented Sewing 
5.3.2. Free Motion Stitching 
5.3.3. Layer Structure 

5.4. CLO Virtual Fashion Fabrics Library 

5.4.1. Commonly Used Fabrics 
5.4.2. Coatings 
5.4.3. Garment Fitting 

5.5. Streamline Process 

5.5.1. Colors and Prints 
5.5.2. Design Composition  
5.5.3. 3D Samples 

5.6. Texture Creation  

5.6.1. Give and Edit Textures 
5.6.2. Opaqueness, Reflection and Position 
5.6.3. Normal Map and Displacement Map 

5.7. Creation of Garments I 

5.7.1. Clothes  
5.7.2. Prints 
5.7.3. Renders  

5.8. Creation of Garments II 

5.8.1. Pleats  
5.8.2. Trims and Straps 
5.8.3. Soleil and Quilting 

5.9. Simulated Environments 

5.9.1. Hairstyling Techniques 
5.9.2. Visualization of Garments in Minority Environments 
5.9.3. Promotion of Virtual Collection 

5.10. Emerging Markets and Entry Techniques  

5.10.1. Cost Calculation 
5.10.2. Auctions   
5.10.3. The Video Game Industry 

Module 6. Styling and Fashion Trends 

6.1. Global Consumer: Oriental and Western 

6.1.1. Fashion in the Globalization Context 
6.1.2. Asian Ostentation 
6.1.3. The Western Legacy 

6.2. The Needs of the Current Consumer  

6.2.1. Profiles of New Consumers 
6.2.2. The Prosumer  
6.2.3. Decision-Making During the Buying Process 

6.3. Visual Expression of Color 

6.3.1. The Importance of Color in Purchasing Decisions 
6.3.2. Chromatic Emotions  
6.3.3. Color in the Ecosystem of Fashion 

6.4. Trend Analysis and Research 

6.4.1. Trend Hunter 
6.4.2. From the Trendsetters to the Mass Consumer 
6.4.3. Specialist Agencies 

6.5. Strategic Release  

6.5.1. Macro Trends and Micro Trends 
6.5.2. Novelty, Trend and “Hype” 
6.5.3. The Product Distribution Cycle 

6.6. Methodology for Trend Analysis 

6.6.1. The Art and Science of Predictive Analysis 
6.6.2. Sources of Information in the Fashion Market 
6.6.3. Insights Extraction  

6.7. Lifestyle of the Fashion Consumer 

6.7.1. Values and Priorities 
6.7.2. The New Luxury and its Place in the Fashion Market 
6.7.3. Between the Physical Shop and the E-commerce  

6.8. Conceptualization of the Fashion Market 

6.8.1. Buying Experience 
6.8.2. "Hotspots” 
6.8.3. Digital Concept Stores  

6.9. Trend Report  

6.9.1. Structure and Composition 
6.9.2. Introduction  
6.9.3. Evaluation and Decision-Making 

6.10. Post Pandemic Consumer Trends 

6.10.1. Permanent Changes in the Habits of Consumers 
6.10.2. Future Purchases 
6.10.3. Technology and Sustainability: The Axis of Change 

Module 7. Visual Identity = UX + Branding 

7.1. Technological Use of Fashion 

7.1.1. Artificial Intelligence 
7.1.2. Materialize the Competitive Advantage 
7.1.3. Chatbot and Virtual Personal Shopper 

7.2. Identity and Change Management 

7.2.1. Brand Identity Design 
7.2.2. Brand Identity Construction 
7.2.3. Economic Impacts 

7.3. Google Analytics and Google Ads 

7.3.1. Strategic Positioning of a Fashion Brand 
7.3.2. Google Ads 
7.3.3. Google Analytics 

7.4. Data Driven Marketing 

7.4.1. The Process of Data Orientation 
7.4.2. Collection and Selection of Data 
7.4.3. Tabulation: Statistical Data 

7.5. Creation of Pattern Sequences 

7.5.1. Key Metrics Management 
7.5.2. Fashion-Specific Metrics 
7.5.3. Pattern Sequences  

7.6. Innovation Scenario Simulation 

7.6.1. Innovation and Creativity 
7.6.2. Simulation and Prediction  
7.6.3. Microsoft Power Bi 

7.7. Segmentation and Management of Databases  

7.7.1. Market Segmentation 
7.7.2. Audience Segmentation 
7.7.3. SQL for Large Volumes of Data 

7.8. Loyalty and Salesforce 

7.8.1. The Emotional Profile of the Fashion Consumer 
7.8.2. User Acquisition, Consumer Retention and Customer Ambassadors 
7.8.3. CRM: Salesforce 

7.9. Content Marketing 

7.9.1. User Experience Creation in a Digital Environment 
7.9.2. Customer Engagement Behaviour 
7.9.3. Content Inside and Outside of My Web 

7.10. Creativity With Python 

7.10.1. Structure and Elements of Language 
7.10.2. Functionalities of Python  
7.10.3. Creativity Based on Data 

Module 8. Commercialization of the Collection 

8.1. Dynamics of the Current Fashions 

8.1.1. Fashion Weeks and Haute Couture 
8.1.2. The Materialization of Ideas and the Sketchbook 
8.1.3. The Conceptualization of the Collection 

8.2. Creation of a Collection  

8.2.1. Moodboards and International Inspiration 
8.2.2. Factories and Suppliers in the World 
8.2.3. Labeling and Packaging  

8.3. Strategic Partnerships and Collaborations 

8.3.1. Strategic Partners  
8.3.2. Between Designers, Business Owners and Artists 
8.3.3. Capsule Collections 

8.4. Styling 

8.4.1. Visual Merchandising 
8.4.2. Showcasing 
8.4.3. Digital Shooting: Mobile Showcasing   

8.5. Fashion Shows and Fashion Capitals 

8.5.1. The Catwalk  
8.5.2. Paris, London and New York 
8.5.3. Virtual Fashion Shows 

8.6. Design Fairs and Events 

8.6.1. Events Management in the Fashion Market 
8.6.2. The Unmissable Events: National and International Fairs 
8.6.3. The B2B Environment 

8.7. Eco-design and the Environmental Impact 

8.7.1. Artisan 
8.7.2. New Luxury 
8.7.3. Sustainable Fashion in Numbers  

8.8. Commercialization of the Collection 

8.8.1. The Omnichannel Orchestra  
8.8.2. Optimizing the Online Channel 
8.8.3. Residual Advantage of Offline 

8.9. Personalized Events  

8.9.1. Audience Alignment  
8.9.2. Communication Strategy 
8.9.3. Staging  

8.10. Final Evaluation of the Collection  

8.10.1. Impressions in Figures 
8.10.2. Advanced Analysis and the Indicators  
8.10.3. Reformulation of the Garments 

Module 9. Fashion Purchasing Management 

9.1. The Dynamics of a Fashion Buyer 

9.1.1. The Life Cycle of a Fashion Product 
9.1.2. Seasonality in the Fashion Industry 
9.1.3. Levers That Activate Brand Equity  

9.2. Formulation With Microsoft Excel 

9.2.1. Operations 
9.2.2. Calculation  
9.2.3. Formulas 

9.3. Excel Applications  

9.3.1. Graphics 
9.3.2. Dynamic Tables 
9.3.3. Forms 

9.4. Addressing Errors 

9.4.1. Format 
9.4.2. Numeric 
9.4.3. Text 

9.5. Creating Databases with Microsoft Access 

9.5.1. Programming in Access 
9.5.2. Types of Data and Properties of the Fields 
9.5.3. Inquiries and Macros 

9.6. Database Reports  

9.6.1. Data Storage 
9.6.2. Database Templates with Access  
9.6.3. Updating Inquiries 

9.7. Big Data With Tableau 

9.7.1. Organization of Data  
9.7.2. Representation of Numeric Values 
9.7.3. Use of Various Data Sources 

9.8. Personalization of Data with Tableau 

9.8.1. Use of Calculations 
9.8.2. Quick Table Calculations 
9.8.3. Lines of Reference 

9.9. Dashboard: Visualization of Data  

9.9.1. Geographic Map 
9.9.2. Visualization and Comparison of Measurements  
9.9.3. Statistics and Prognosis 

9.10. Project Management 

9.10.1. Product Owner 
9.10.2. Lean Methodology  
9.10 3. Agile Methodology 

Module 10. Entrepreneurship and Creative Direction Workshop 

10.1. Innovation and Creativity in Fashion Markets  

10.1.1. Reinvent What Already Exists in Fashion Design 
10.1.2. Create New Patterns From Nothing 
10.1.3. Patents on Fabrics  

10.2. Disruptive Thinking and Design Thinking 

10.2.1. Disruptive Thinking and its Global Impact 
10.2.2. The Visual Schema and Design Thinking 
10.2.3. Problem Solving 

10.3. Leadership and Business Mentality 

10.3.1. The Team 
10.3.2. Personal Brand 
10.3.3. Management of Business Evolution and Growth  

10.4. The Value Chain in the Fashion and Luxury Industry 

10.4.1. Structure of the Fashion Market on a Global Level 
10.4.2. The Traditional Value Chain 
10.4.3. The Evolution of the Links in the Fashion Value Chain 

10.5. The Fashionable Start-up  

10.5.1. Legal Framework 
10.5.2. Funding Rounds 
10.5.3. The Jump to Internationalization 

10.6. Creative Direction for Fashion Businesses 

10.6.1. The Dynamics of Creativity   
10.6.2. Professional Profiles  
10.6.3. Functions of the Creative Director 

10.7. Neurobiology of Creativity 

10.7.1. Intelligence   
10.7.2. Creative Quantification 
10.7.3. Social Media   

10.8. Creativity Techniques 

10.8.1. Creative Block  
10.8.2. Techniques for Ideas Generation 
10.8.3. CRE- IN 

10.9. Sources of Inspiration  

10.9.1. Mastering Fashion's Past 
10.9.2. Aspirations: The Future  
10.9.3. The Compositional Balance Between Past and Future 

10.10. Showcasing 

10.10.1. The Compositive Framework of a Fashion Collection 
10.10.2. Perception of the Spectator  
10.10.3. The Imagery of Fashion Brands 

Module 11. Fundamentals of Design

11.1. History of Design 

11.1.1. Industrial Revolution 
11.1.2. Stages of Design 
11.1.3. Architecture 
11.1.4. The Chicago School 

11.2. Styles and Design Movements 

11.2.1. Decorative Design 
11.2.2. Modernist Movement  
11.2.3. Art Deco 
11.2.4. Industrial Design 
11.2.5. Bauhaus 
11.2.6. World War II 
11.2.7. Trans-avantgarde 
11.2.8. Contemporary Design 

11.3. Designers and Trends 

11.3.1. Interior Designers 
11.3.2. Graphic Designers 
11.3.3. Industrial or Product Designers 
11.3.4. Fashion Designers 

11.4. Design Methodology 

11.4.1. Bruno Munari 
11.4.2. Gui Bonsiepe 
11.4.3. J. Christopher Jones 
11.4.4. L. Bruce Archer 
11.4.5. Guillermo González Ruiz 
11.4.6. Jorge Frascara 
11.4.7. Bernd Löbach 
11.4.8. Joan Costa 
11.4.9. Norberto Cháves 

11.5. The Language of Design 

11.5.1. Objects and Subjects 
11.5.2. Semiotics of Objects 
11.5.3. The Object Layout and its Connotation 
11.5.4. Globalization of the Signs 
11.5.5. Proposal 

11.6. Design and its Aesthetic-Formal Dimension 

11.6.1. Visual Elements 

11.6.1.1. Shape 
11.6.1.2. Measurement 
11.6.1.3. Color 
11.6.1.4. Texture 

11.6.2. Relationship Elements 

11.6.2.1. Management 
11.6.2.2. Position 
11.6.2.3. Spatial 
11.6.2.4. Severity 

11.6.3. Practical Elements 

11.6.3.1. Representation 
11.6.3.2. Meaning 
11.6.3.3. Function 

11.6.4. Framework of Reference 

11.7. Analytical Methods of Design 

11.7.1. Pragmatic Design 
11.7.2. Analogical Design 
11.7.3. Iconic Design 
11.7.4. Canonical Design 
11.7.5. Main Authors and Their Methodology 

11. 8. Design and Semantics 

11.8.1. Semantics 
11.8.2. Meaning 
11.8.3. Denotative Meaning and Connotative Meaning 
11.8.4. Lexis 
11.8.5. Lexical Field and Lexical Family 
11.8.6. Semantic Relationships 
11.8.7. Semantic Change 
11.8.8. Causes of Semantic Changes 

11.9. Design and Pragmatics 

11.9.1. Practical Implications, Abduction and Semiotics
11.9.2. Mediation, Body and Emotions
11.9.3. Learning, Experience and Closure
11.9.4. Identity, Social Relations and Objectives

11.10. Current Context of the Design 

11.10.1. Current Problems of the Design 
11.10.2. Current Themes of the Design 
11.10.3. Methodological Contributions

Module 12. Pattern Making and Tailoring

12.1. Introduction to Pattern Making

12.1.1. Basic Concepts of Pattern Making
12.1.2. Tools and Materials in Pattern Making
12.1.3. Obtaining Anatomical Measurements
12.1.4. Measurement Tables
12.1.5. Types of Pattern-Making
12.1.6. Industrialization of Models
12.1.7. Information That the Pattern Must Contain

12.2. Female Pattern

12.2.1. Skirt Base Pattern
12.2.2. Body Base Pattern
12.2.3. Trouser Base Pattern
12.2.4. Dress Base Pattern
12.2.5. Collars
12.2.6. Sleeves 
12.2.7. Details

12.3. Male Pattern

12.3.1. Body Base Pattern
12.3.2. Trouser Base Pattern
12.3.3. Coat Base Pattern
12.3.4. Collars 
12.3.5. Sleeves
12.3.6. Details

12.4. Children’s Pattern

12.4.1. Body Base Pattern
12.4.2. Trouser Base Pattern
12.4.3. Leotard Base Pattern
12.4.4. One-Piece Base Pattern
12.4.5. Sleeves 
12.4.6. Collars
12.4.7. Details

12.5. Transformation, Development and Scaling of the Pattern

12.5.1. Transformation of Patterns
12.5.2. Development of Pattern Making
12.5.3. Scale and Full-Size Patterns

12.6. Introduction to Cutting and Tailoring

12.6.1. Introduction to Sewing
12.6.2. Tools and Materials in Sewing
12.6.3. The Cut
12.6.4. Sewing By Hand
12.6.5. Flat Machine Sewing
12.6.6. Types of Sewing Machines

12.7. Identifying Textiles

12.7.1. Flat Fabrics
12.7.2. Complex Fabrics
12.7.3. Technical Fabrics
12.7.4. Knitted Fabrics
12.7.5. Materials

12.8. Types of Sewing and Garment Transformation

12.8.1. Flat Seam
12.8.2. Interior Seam
12.8.3. Curved Seam
12.8.4. French Seam
12.8.5. Denim Seam
12.8.6. Overlock Seam
12.8.7. Ribbed Seam

12.9. Closures, Finishing and Textile Finishing

12.9.1. Fabric Dyeing
12.9.2. Buttons
12.9.3. Zippers
12.9.4. Apliques
12.9.5. Lining of the Piece
12.9.6. Trims
12.9.7. Ironed

12.10. Moulage

12.10.1. Preparation of the Mannequin
12.10.2. Research on the Mannequin
12.10.3. From Mannequin to Pattern
12.10.4. Modeling a Garment

Module 13. Photography

13.1. History of Photography

13.1.1. Background of Photography
13.1.2. Color Photography
13.1.3. Photographic Movie
13.1.4. Digital Camera

13.2. Image Formation

13.2.1. Photographic Camera
13.2.2. Basic Parameters in Photography
13.2.3. Photometry    
13.2.4. Objectives and Focal Distance

13.3. Photographic Language

13.3.1. Types of Plans
13.3.2. Formal, Compositional and Interpretative Elements of the Photographic Image
13.3.3. Framing
13.3.4. Representation of Time and Movement in Photography
13.3.5. The Relationship of a Photograph With the Reality and the Truth

13.4. Photographic Camera

13.4.1. Analog and Digital Cameras
13.4.2. Simple Cameras
13.4.3. Reflex
13.4.4. Basic Photographic Techniques
13.4.5. Exposure and Exposure Meters
13.4.6. Reflex Digital Camera Sensor
13.4.7. Handling a Digital Camera Compared to an Analog One
13.4.8. Specific Aspects of Interest
13.4.9. Working Modes with the Digital Camera

13.5. Digital Image

13.5.1. File Formats
13.5.2. White Balance
13.5.3. Color Temperature
13.5.4. Histogram Exposure of Digital Photography
13.5.5. Dynamic Range

13.6. The Behavior of Light

13.6.1. The Photon
13.6.2. Reflection and Absorption
13.6.3. Quantity and Quality of Light

13.6.3.1. Hard Light and Soft Light
13.6.3.2. Direct and Diffused Light

13.7. Expressiveness and Aesthetics of Lighting

13.7.1. Shadows, Modifiers and Depth
13.7.2. Lighting Angles
13.7.3. Lighting Schemes
13.7.4. Light Measurement

13.7.4.1. The Photometer
13.7.4.2. Incident Light
13.7.4.3. Reflected Light
13.7.4.4. Measurement Over Several Points
13.7.4.5. Contrast
13.7.4.6. Grey Matter

13.7.5. Natural Light Illumination

13.7.5.1. Diffusers
13.7.5.2. Reflectors

13.7.6. Artificial Light Illumination

13.7.6.1. Photographic Study
13.7.6.2. Sources of Inspiration
13.7.6.3. Cold Light
13.7.6.4. Studio Flash and Compact Flash
13.7.6.5. Accessories

13.8. Editing Software

13.8.1. Adobe Lightroom
13.8.2. Adobe Photoshop 
13.8.3. Plugins

13.9. Photo Editing and Development

13.9.1. RAW Camera Development
13.9.2. Noise and Focus
13.9.3. Exposure, Contrast and Saturation Settings Levels and Curves

13.10. References and Applications

13.10.1. Most Important Photographers in History
13.10.2. Photography in Interior Design
13.10.3. Photography in Product Design 
13.10.4. Photography in Fashion Design
13.10.5. Photography in Graphic Design

Module 14. Fashion Drawing

14.1. History of Illustration 

14.1.1. History of Illustration
14.1.2. Typology
14.1.3. Posters
14.1.4. Illustrators

14.2. Materials and Mediums in Illustration

14.2.1. Materials
14.2.2. Mediums
14.2.3. New Technologies

14.3. Artistic Anatomy    

14.3.1. Introduction to Artistic Anatomy 
14.3.2. Head and Neck
14.3.3. Torso
14.3.4. Upper Limbs
14.3.5. Lower Limbs
14.3.6. Movement

14.4. Proportion of the Human Body

14.4.1. Anthropometry
14.4.2. Proportion 
14.4.3. Canons
14.4.4. Morphology
14.4.5. Proportion

14.5. Basic Composition

14.5.1. Front
14.5.2. Back
14.5.3. Profile
14.5.4. Foreshortenings
14.5.5. Movement

14.6. The Human Face

14.6.1. Head
14.6.2. The Eyes
14.6.3. The Nose
14.6.4. The Mouth
14.6.5. The eyebrows
14.6.6. The ears
14.6.7. Hair

14.7. The Human Figure

14.7.1. Balance of the Body 
14.7.2. The Arm
14.7.3. The Hand
14.7.4. The Foot
14.7.5. The Leg
14.7.6. The Bust
14.7.7. The Human Figure

14.8. Fashion Illustration Techniques

14.8.1. Traditional Technique
14.8.2. Digital Technique
14.8.3. Mixed Technique
14.8.4. Collage Technique

14.9. Illustration of Materials

14.9.1. Tweed
14.9.2. Patent Leather
14.9.3. Wool
14.9.4. Sequins
14.9.5. Transparency
14.9.6. Silk
14.9.7. Denim
14.9.8. Leather
14.9.9. Animal Fur
14.9.10. Other Materials

14.10. The Search for Personal Style

14.10.1. Fashion Figure
14.10.2. Styling
14.10.3. Fashion Poses
14.10.4. Hairstyles
14.10.5. Design

Module 15. Textile Technology

15.1. Introduction to Textiles

15.1.1. History of Textiles
15.1.2. Textiles Over Time
15.1.3. Traditional Textile Machinery
15.1.4. The Importance of Textiles in Fashion
15.1.5. Symbolism Used in Textile Materials
15.1.6. Fabric Technical Data Sheet

15.2. Textile Materials

15.2.1. Classification of Textile Fibers

15.2.1.1. Natural Fibers
15.2.1.2. Artificial Fibers
15.2.1.3. Synthetic Fibers

15.2.2. Properties of the Fibers
15.2.3. Recognizing Textile Fibers

15.3. Threads

15.3.1. Basic Ligaments
15.3.2. General Characteristics of Threads
15.3.3. Classification of Threads
15.3.4. Spinning Phases
15.3.5. Machines Used 
15.3.6. Yarn Numbering Systems

15.4. Openwork Textiles

15.4.1. Openwork Fabrics
15.4.2. Ligament Staggering
15.4.3. Ligaments in Openwork Fabrics
15.4.4. Classification of Ligaments
15.4.5. Types of Ligaments
15.4.6. Types of Openwork Fabrics
15.4.7. The Openwork Loom
15.4.8. Special Looms

15.5. Knitted Fabrics

15.5.1. History of Knitted Fabric
15.5.2. Classification
15.5.3. Typology
15.5.4. Comparison Between Flat Fabric and a Knitted One
15.5.5. Characteristics and Behavior According to its Construction 
15.5.6. Technology and Machinery for Obtaining It

15.6. Textile Finishes

15.6.1. Physical Finishes
15.6.2. Chemical Finishes
15.6.3. Fabric Resistance
15.6.4. Pilling’
15.6.5. Dimensional Change of Fabrics

15.7. Dye

15.7.1. Previous Treatment
15.7.2. Dye
15.7.3. Machinery
15.7.4. Inputs
15.7.5. Optical Brightening
15.7.6. Color

15.8. Printing

15.8.1. Direct Printing

15.8.1.1. Block Printing
15.8.1.2. Roller Printing
15.8.1.3. Thermotransfer Printing
15.8.1.4. Screen Printing
15.8.1.5. Warp Printing
15.8.1.6. Corrosion Printing

15.8.2. Reserve Printing

15.8.2.1. Batik
15.8.2.2. Tie-Dye

15.8.3. Other Types of Prints

15.8.3.1. Differential Printing
15.8.3.2. Polychromatic Electrostatic

15.9. Technical and Intelligent Fabrics

15.9.1. Definition and Analysis
15.9.2. Application of Textiles 
15.9.3. New Materials and Technologies 

15.10. Skin, Leather and Others

15.10.1. Skin and Leather
15.10.2. Classification of Leather
15.10.3. Tanning Process
15.10.4. Post-Tanning Treatment
15.10.5. Technological Process of Tanning
15.10.6. Conservation Methods
15.10.7. Synthetic Leather
15.10.8. Debate: Natural or Synthetic Leather

Module 16. Representation Systems Applied to Fashion

16.1. Introduction to the Technical Drawing of Fashion

16.1.1. How and When are Technical Drawings Used?
16.1.2. How to Create a Technical Drawing for Fashion
16.1.3. Drawing From a Physical Garment
16.1.4. Technical Guidelines in Fashion

16.2. Documentation Preparation

16.2.1. Preparing the Document for Technical Drawing
16.2.2. Anatomical Base Mannequin
16.2.3. Color, Texture and Prints

16.3. Lower Body Garments

16.3.1. Skirts
16.3.2. Pants
16.3.3. Stockings

16.4. Upper Body Garments

16.4.1. Shirts  
16.4.2. T-Shirts
16.4.3. Vests
16.4.4. Jackets
16.4.5. Coats

16.5. Underwear Garments

16.5.1. Bra
16.5.2. Underpants
16.5.3. Briefs

16.6. Details of the Model

16.6.1. Neckline
16.6.2. Collars
16.6.3. Sleeves
16.6.4. Cuffs
16.6.5. Pockets

16.7. Design Details

16.7.1. Construction Details
16.7.2. Decorative Design Details
16.7.3. Pleats
16.7.4. Stitches
16.7.5. Tips
16.7.6. Ribbing

16.8. Fasteners and Trimmings

16.8.1. Zippers
16.8.2. Buttons
16.8.3. Hooks
16.8.4. Tape
16.8.5. Knots
16.8.6. Buttonholes
16.8.7. Velcro
16.8.8. Eyelets
16.8.9. Loops
16.8.10. Studs
16.8.11. Rivets
16.8.12. Rings
16.8.13. Buckles

16.9. Accessories

16.9.1. Bags
16.9.2. Glasses 
16.9.3. Footwear
16.9.4. Jewelry 

16.10. The Technical Data Sheet

16.10.1. Technical Drawing Export
16.10.2. Information of the Technical Data Sheet
16.10.3. Models and Types of Technical Data Sheet
16.10.4. Completing a Technical Data Sheet

Module 17. Fashion Design

17.1. Methodology of Fashion Design

17.1.1. Concept of a Fashion Project
17.1.2. Project Methodology Applied to Fashion
17.1.3. Research Methods in Fashion Design
17.1.4. The Briefing or Design Demand
17.1.5. Documentation
17.1.6. Analysis of Current Fashion
17.1.7. Forming Ideas

17.2. Creative Processes Applied to Fashion Design

17.2.1. The Field Notebook
17.2.2. Moodboard
17.2.3. Graphic Research
17.2.4. Creativity Techniques

17.3. References

17.3.1. Commercial Fashion
17.3.2. Creative Fashion
17.3.3. Stage Fashion
17.3.4. Corporative Fashion

17.4. Collection Concept

17.4.1. Functionality of the Garment
17.4.2. Clothing as a Message
17.4.3. Ergonomic Concepts

17.5. Stylistic Codes

17.5.1. Permanent Stylistic Codes
17.5.2. Seasonal Stylistic Codes
17.5.3. The Search for Personal Stamp

17.6. Collection Development

17.6.1. Theoretical Framework
17.6.2. Context
17.6.3. Research
17.6.4. References
17.6.5. Conclusions
17.6.6. Representation of the Collection

17.7. Technical Study

17.7.1. Textile Chart
17.7.2. Chromatic Chart
17.7.3. The Glaze
17.7.4. The Technical Data Sheet 
17.7.5. Prototype
17.7.6. Price Tag

17.8. Interdisciplinary Projects

17.8.1. Drawing
17.8.2. Pattern Making
17.8.3. Sewing

17.9. Production of a Collection

17.9.1. From Sketch to Technical Drawing
17.9.2. Artisanal Workshops
17.9.3. New Technologies

17.10. Communication and Presentation Strategy

17.10.1. Photography in Fashion Lookbook, Editorial and Campaign
17.10.2. Portfolio
17.10.3. Catwalk
17.10.4. Other Forms of Exhibiting the Collection

Module 18. Sustainability in Fashion

18.1. Reconsider Fashion Design

18.1.1. The Supply Chain
18.1.2. Main Aspects
18.1.3. Development of Sustainable Fashion
18.1.4. Future of Fashion

18.2. Life Cycle of an Item of Clothing

18.2.1. Think in the Life Cycle
18.2.2. Actions and Impact
18.2.3. Evaluation Tools and Models
18.2.4. Strategies for Sustainable Design

18.3. Quality and Safety Standards in the Textile Sector

18.3.1. Quality
18.3.2. Labelling
18.3.3. Safety of Garments
18.3.4. Consumption Inspections

18.4. Planned Obsolescence

18.4.1. Planned Obsolescence and Waste of Electrical and Electronic Devices
18.4.2. Extraction of Resources
18.4.3. Waste Generation
18.4.4. Recycling and Reusing Electrical Waste
18.4.5. Responsible Consumption

18.5. Sustainable Design

18.5.1. Garment Design
18.5.2. Design With Empathy
18.5.3. Selection of Fabric, Materials and Techniques
18.5.4. Use of Monomaterials

18.6. Sustainable Production

18.6.1. Pattern Making and Modeling
18.6.2. Techniques For Zero Waste
18.6.3. Construction
18.6.4. Design to Last

18.7. Sustainable Distribution

18.7.1. Suppliers and Producers
18.7.2. The Promise With Local Communities
18.7.3. Sales
18.7.4. Design According to Need
18.7.5. Inclusive Fashion Design

18.8. Sustainable Use of the Garment

18.8.1. Patterns of Use
18.8.2. How to Reduce the Laundry?
18.8.3. Repairs and Maintenance
18.8.4. Design for Repairs
18.8.5. Modular Garment Design

18.9. Recycling

18.9.1. Reusing and Remanufacturing
18.9.2. Revaluing
18.9.3. Recycling Materials
18.9.4. Closed Cycle Production

18.10. Sustainable Fashion Designers

18.10.1. Katharine Hamnett
18.10.2. Stella McCartney
18.10.3. Annika Matilda Wendelboe
18.10.4. Susan Dimasi
18.10.5. Isabell de Hillerin

Module 19. History of Fashion

19.1. From Clothing to Fashion

19.1.1. New Context and Social Change
19.1.2. Liberation of Women
19.1.3. Concept of a Fashion Designers
19.1.4. Start of the 20th Century

19.2. Modern Clothing

19.2.1. Modern Clothing
19.2.2. The Rise of American Designers
19.2.3. The London Scene
19.2.4. New York in the 70s
19.2.5. 80s Fashion
19.2.6. Multibrand Luxury Groups
19.2.7. Functional Fashion
19.2.8. Activewear
19.2.9. Fashion, Art and Pop Culture
19.2.10. Celebrities
19.2.11. Photography and Internet

19.3. Great Female Masters of Fashion

19.3.1. Jeanne Lanvin 
19.3.2. Jeanne Paquin 
19.3.3. Emilie Flöge 
19.3.4. Madeleine Vionnet
19.3.5. Gabrielle Chanel 
19.3.6. Elsa Schiaparelli 
19.3.7. Carolina Herrera

19.4. Great Male Masters of Fashion

19.4.1. Charles Frederick Worth 
19.4.2. Jacques Doucet 
19.4.3. Paul Poiret
19.4.4. Cristóbal Balenciaga
19.4.5. Christian Dior
19.4.6. Karl Lagerfeld
19.4.7. Alexander McQueen

19.5. Haute Couture

19.5.1. History of Haute Couture
19.5.2. Haute Couture Federation and Fashion
19.5.3. Members of the Federation    
19.5.4. From Haute Couture to Prêt-à-porter

19.6. Artisan

19.6.1. Fabric as Art
19.6.2. Artisans Who Complement Clothing
19.6.3. Artists and Artisans Related to Fashion

19.7. Fast-Fashion

19.7.1. History and Origin of Fast-Fashion
19.7.2. Business Model of Fast-Fashion
19.7.3. Consequences of Fast-Fashion on the World

19.8. Advertising and Photography in Fashion

19.8.1. Archetypes and Stereotypes
19.8.2. Fashion Image
19.8.3. Visual Communication of Fashion
19.8.4. The Great Photographers of Fashion

19.9. Consequences of Fashion

19.9.1. Textile Industry
19.9.2. Relationship Between Art and Fashion
19.9.3. Fashion and Society

19.10. Fashion Theory and Criticism

19.10.1. Current Designers and Their Influence
19.10.2. Current Trends
19.10.3. The Trivialization of Fashion

Module 20. Advanced Fashion Design

20.1. Markets for Fashion

20.1.1. Female Fashion
20.1.2. Fashion Markets
20.1.3. Specialized Markets

20.2. Seasons

20.2.1. Seasons 
20.2.2. The Cycle of Fashion
20.2.3. Trends in Fashion
20.2.4. Trend Analysis
20.2.5. Project Development

20.3. Creative Research 

20.3.1. Inspiration
20.3.2. The Field Notebook
20.3.3. Materials
20.3.4. Moodboard

20.4. Development and Techniques 

20.4.1. Development Strategies
20.4.2. Elements of Design
20.4.3. Construction Techniques
20.4.4. Development Techniques
20.4.5. Collection Rationale

20.5. Fashion Design

20.5.1. What is Fashion Design?
20.5.2. Tailoring
20.5.3. The Fashion Industry
20.5.4. Fashion Collection
20.5.5. Cutting, Tailoring and Finishing

20.6. Fashion Accessories

20.6.1. Definition of Accessories
20.6.2. Most-Used Accessories in Collections
20.6.3. The Industry and the Accessory

20.7. How to Present a Project

20.7.1. Presentation in Fashion
20.7.2. Presenting a Collection
20.7.3. Fashion Styling    

20.8. Where and When to Present a Project

20.8.1. The Fashion Calendar
20.8.2. Fashion Garments
20.8.3. Editorials in Fashion
20.8.4. Fairs and Events

20.9. Communication Strategies of the Project 

20.9.1. Second Lines
20.9.2. Expanding the Collection
20.9.3. Practice

20.10. Design and the Company

20.10.1. Fashion Entrepreneurship
20.10.2. Branding
20.10.3. Marketing as Promotion
20.10.4. Rights of the Author

Module 21. History of Clothing 

21.1. Prehistory 

21.1.1. Introduction 
21.1.2. Prehistoric Civilizations 
21.1.3. Commerce of the Prehistoric times 
21.1.4. Prehistoric Dress 
21.1.5. Furs and Fur Shops 
21.1.6. Fabrics and Techniques 
21.1.7. Chronological Concordance and Similarities in Prehistoric Dress 

21.2. Ancient Age: Egypt and Mesopotamia 

21.2.1. Egypt 
21.2.2. The Assyrian People 
21.2.3. The Persian People 

21.3. Ancient Age: Classical Greece 

21.3.1. Cretan Dress 
21.3.2. The Fabrics Used in Ancient Greece 
21.3.3. Ancient Greek Clothing  
21.3.4. Ancient Greek Underwear 
21.3.5. Ancient Greek Footwear  
21.3.6. Ancient Greek Hats and Headdresses 
21.3.7. Ancient Greek Colors and Embellishments 
21.3.8. Ancient Greek Accessories 

21.4. Ancient Age: The Roman Empire 

21.4.1. The Fabric of the Roman Empire 
21.4.2. The Clothing of the Roman Empire 
21.4.3. Underwear of the Roman Empire 
21.4.4. Footwear of the Roman Empire 
21.4.5. Hats and Headdresses of the Roman Empire 
21.4.6. Relationship Between Social Status and Clothing in Ancient Rome 
21.4.7. Bizantine Style 

21.5. Early and Late Middle Ages 

21.5.1. General Historical Features of Medieval Times 
21.5.2. Clothing in the Early Medieval Period 
21.5.3. Clothing in the Carolingian Period 
21.5.4. Clothing in the Romanesque Period 
21.5.5. Clothing in the Gothic Period 

21.6. Modern Age: Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo 

21.6.1. 15th and 16th century  Renaissance 
21.6.2. 17th Century Baroque period 
21.6.3. 18th Century Rococo 

21.7. Contemporary Era: Neoclassicism and Romanticism 

21.7.1. The Clothing Industry 
21.7.2. Charles Fréderick Worht 
21.7.3. Jacquet Doucet 
21.7.4. Female Clothing 
21.7.5. Josefina Bonaparte: The Imperial Style  

21.8. Contemporary Era: Victorian Period and the Belle Époque  

21.8.1. Queen Victoria  
21.8.2. Male Clothing  
21.8.3. Dandy  
21.8.4. Paul Poiret  
21.8.5. Madeleine Vionnet  

21.9. Contemporary Era: From Clothing to Fashion  

21.9.1. New Context and Social Change  
21.9.2. Fashion Designers   
21.9.3. Coco Chanel  
21.9.4. The New look  

21.10. Contemporary Era: The Century of Designers and Fashion  

21.10.1. Modern Clothing  
21.10.2. The Rise of American Designers  
21.10.3. The London Scene

Module 22. Male Pattern Making 

22.1. Evolution of Male Fashion 

22.1.1. Social and Historical Context of Male Fashion 
22.1.2. Renunciation of Ornamentation and Reconquest of the Right to Fashion 
22.1.3. History of Tailoring 

22.2. Male Clothing 

22.2.1. Typologies of Garments and Variations 
22.2.2. Male Accessories 
22.2.3. Brand Analysis and Communication 
22.2.4. Trends of the Moment 

22.3. Male Morphology Study 

22.3.1. Evolution of the Male Body 
22.3.2. Studies of the Male Body 
22.3.3. Typology of the Male Body 

22.4. Pattern of the Shirt 

22.4.1. Measurements 
22.4.2. Layout 
22.4.3. Variations 

22.5. Trouser Pattern  

22.5.1. Measurements 
22.5.2. Layout 
22.5.3. Variations 

22.6. Jacket Layout 

22.6.1. Measurements 
22.6.2. Layout 
22.6.3. Variations 

22.7. Jacket Lapel Designs 

22.7.1. Measurements 
22.7.2. Layout 
22.7.3. Variations 

22.8. Vest Pattern 

22.8.1. Measurements 
22.8.2. Layout 
22.8.3. Variations 

22.9. Male Coat 

22.9.1. Measurements 
22.9.2. Layout 
22.9.3. Variations 

22.10. Traditional Tailoring 

22.10.1. Materials 
22.10.2. Lining 
22.10.3. Mounting 
22.10.4. Stitches

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